The Guest List by Lucy Foley – review

I’m not really a crime thriller person and on the occasions I’ve dipped into the genre I’ve often come away disappointed. I was super happy, then, to discover The Guest List, a thriller I genuinely enjoyed – it’s always a little bit rejuvenating to read something different to your normal fare and to come away feeling positive about it. It’s a variation of the classic locked room mystery: a murder takes place during a wedding party on a remote island, with a select guest list and a location cut off from the outside world. Among the group, grudges are ubiquitous and as you would suspect, the various characters’ seedy backstories provide a vast selection of possible motives for a killing. The fun of this kind of set up is that every reader has a genuine chance of guessing the solution to the puzzle and Lucy Foley turns out to be an extremely fair writer when it comes to providing decent clues; she creates a very clever story yet refrains from any impulse to pull the rug out from under your feet for the sake of an outlandish twist, a device that appears all to often in crime fiction and can simply leave you feeling cheated.

The book is written from the point of view of a number of different wedding guests, the narrative hopping between characters every chapter. I’ve read a couple of other books in which this way of writing hasn’t really worked for me, because I found a particular character uninteresting or their voice didn’t ring true, but in The Guest List I loved it. It kept the story moving at a rapid pace, and because the chapters are pretty short it constantly tempts you into thinking “just one more”; before you know it you’re over half way through and then, well, there’s no point in stopping! That’s not to say all the people you meet in the course of the novel are enjoyable company – far from it. The wedding is a ridiculously lavish affair, bride Jules and groom Will being a high-flying editor and a TV star, and the couple are as strident and egotistical a pair as you’d expect. The groom’s friends, who make up a large proportion of the titular guest list, are an obnoxious, posturing posse from his private school days, their innate sense of entitlement all too often tipping over into cruelty and harassment. Among the bride’s friends and family there are a few more sympathetic figures, in particular her sister Olivia, whose mental fragility is immediately obvious to the reader even as it exasperates the bride who can’t bear for the attention to be on anyone else but her. You’d think, given the descriptions above, that the book might be unbearable, so awful are some of the main players, but as the story goes on, the author gradually reveals flaws and vulnerabilities that make us feel, if not entirely sorry for them, at least more understanding of their behaviour.

The dialogue is a little bit cringe-worthy in places, primarily the banter between Will’s school friends – although I couldn’t decide whether this was down to the writing or simply the fact that any drunken persiflage will end up reading a bit lamely when it’s down on paper. This aside though, the style is brilliantly easy to read and keeps the story moving along at just the right pace. Another clever little device is the fact that, although the book opens with the moment the wedding guests hear the screams indicating something terrible has just happened, we don’t know for sure who the victim is until a bit later on. Quite honestly, by the time the novel reached its conclusion there were a number of characters I would have been quite happy to see with a knife in their back!

All I’ll say about the conclusion itself is that it’s punch-the-air perfect and not what I had guessed at all. I had such a fun time with The Guest List in fact that I’m absolutely going to be buying her first novel, The Hunting Party, which I gather is a similar kind of set-up, and if it’s anywhere near as enjoyable should be a cracking read. As ever, if you’ve read either of Lucy Foley’s books I’d love to hear what you thought!

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